Wednesday 26 October 2016 | RSS


    Three in four Android users would use an NFC payments service

    More than three quarters of Android users (78%) would use a service similar to Apple Pay if it became available to them, a survey conducted by Helixion has found.

    HelixionOverall, half of the 450 respondents from the UK, US, Australia, Canada and Italy are aware of Apple Pay and know what it does. Awareness is highest in the US (69%), followed by 65% of UK consumers, 58% of Italian consumers, some 53% of Canadian consumers and just under half of Australian consumers.

    83% of Australian consumers would use a similar service to Apple Pay if it were to become available to them, 81% of Canadian and Italian consumers would also do so, followed by 73% of US consumers and 69% of those surveyed in the UK.

    Google and its Android Pay service was the most popular choice to provide such a service. 3% chose Apple.

    “Only time will tell how long it will be before those 78% become actual users,” Helixion says. “One thing is for sure, mobile payment on Android has strong potential. We believe the results reflect that the appetite for mobile contactless payment is linked to contactless payment usage more generally — Australia and Canada are two of the leading countries when it comes to contactless payment.

    “Apple Pay certainly helps drive awareness of mobile payment, but it seems safe to assume that people paying contactlessly with cards are more likely to do it with mobile.”

    • onstrike112

      Too bad Google monopolistically bought and killed Softcard for everyone but Google Android users. Some people use BlackBerry devices…. where we have NFC and no service to speak of for NFC payments. Thank you Google, continuing to make sure there’s less and less choice for the end user.

    • Yes.. mobile payments would be awesome, especially with their back-of-phone-finger-print update ~ pull out phone, tap-to-terminal, done. A million times more secure than a tappy-credit-card, just as quick ~ as long as your phone doesn’t die…

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