Samsung to include a cryptocurrency key store in the Galaxy S10?

Samsung Blockchain KeyStore confirmed by Galaxy S10 leaked images — SamMobile — “The images show the Samsung Blockchain Keystore app running on the Galaxy S10. The splash page mentions that this app is a ‘secure and convenient place for your cryptocurrency’… There’s also going to be a relevant menu item for Blockchain KeyStore in the Settings app under the Biometrics and Security section. It mentions that the service lets users secure and manage their blockchain private key.”


HID Global supplies RFID tickets to 2018 World Cup

HID Global scores big with smart and secure tickets for 2018 Fifa World Cup — HID Global — PARTNER NEWS — “The 2018 Fifa World Cup ticket is a smart ticket containing a radio frequency identification (RFID) inlay and manufactured with special security papers and integrates several security features designed to prevent counterfeiting and forgery… Attendees can simply tap their tickets to a reader to validate them and gain access to an event, speeding up admissions dramatically in high-volume events such as World Cup matches.”


Researchers show how invisible backdoors can be hidden in chips during manufacture

Adding backdoors at the chip level — Schneier on Security — “In this paper we propose an extremely stealthy approach for implementing hardware Trojans below the gate level… we insert our hardware Trojans by changing the dopant polarity of existing transistors. Since the modified circuit appears legitimate on all wiring layers (including all metal and polysilicon), our family of Trojans is resistant to most detection techniques.”


New protocol alerts users to encryption breaches

Computer scientists address gap in messaging privacy — University of Birmingham — “With current end-to-end encryption, if an attacker compromises a recipient’s device, they can then put themselves in a position to intercept, read and alter all future communications without sender or recipient ever knowing. The new protocol, published in IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, forces attackers to leave evidence of any such activity and alerts users to take action.”


Researchers demo voice assistant security flaw

A simple design flaw makes it astoundingly easy to hack Siri and Alexa — Co.Design — “Using a technique called the DolphinAttack, a team from Zhejiang University translated typical vocal commands into ultrasonic frequencies that are too high for the human ear to hear, but perfectly decipherable by the microphones and software powering our always-on voice assistants. This relatively simple translation process lets them take control of gadgets with just a few words uttered in frequencies none of us can hear.”


Heat become first NBA team with mobile-only entry

Heat become first NBA team with mobile-only entry — ESPN — “The Miami Heat announced Thursday that fans who attend home games this upcoming season will only be able to get through the gate with tickets on their phones… Teams are gradually shifting to mobile tickets, they say, in part to reduce fraud, but also to get valuable information about the fan who actually winds up in a specific seat.”



Ticketmaster will soon admit you to events using audio data transmitted from your phone

Ticketmaster will soon admit you to events using audio data transmitted from your phone — VentureBeat — “Ticketmaster will soon be able to admit you to live events and track your movement using nothing more than a discrete digital audio broadcast from your smartphone… The ticketing giant has teamed up with Lisnr, a data-over-audio company that uses an ultrasonic sound technology it calls ‘smart tones’ to transmit information between devices.”


Synthetic fingerprints make plastic particles tiny security keys

Synthetic fingerprints make plastic particles tiny security keys — New Scientist — “Microscopic wrinkles squeezed onto the surface of tiny plastic particles could be used to create security keys that are impossible to duplicate… The particles could be used to verify a person’s identity instead of them using a security card, or their own fingerprint. The particles could also be fixed to a priceless piece of art so people can be sure it’s the real deal.”



Rise of the technophobe – education key to tech adoption, says HSBC

Rise of the technophobe – education key to tech adoption, says HSBC — HSBC — “The study of more than 12,000 people in 11 countries reveals four in every five people (80%) believe that technology makes their lives easier but less than half (46%) trust fingerprint recognition to replace their password, despite it being recognised to be at least five times more secure and significantly more convenient than traditional passwords.”





EU agency calls for action on IoT security

ENISA logo

The EU Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) is calling on the European Commission to define a policy framework ensuring minimal requirements for the security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices along with the development of mandatory staged requirements for security and privacy to give stakeholders a “level playing field” in implementing trust into connected devices and IoT systems. More



Android O will focus on ‘vitals’ like battery life and speed, first beta launches today

Android O will focus on ‘vitals’ like battery life and speed, first beta launches today — The Verge — “For security, Google is introducing a new feature called Google Play Protect. Google already scans apps in the Play Store to make sure they aren’t malicious, but now it’s going to make that more visible by showing that your phone’s apps have recently been scanned when you’re in the Store.”